Guest Post – Cool Coffee Tables for your Home

About the Author:

This post is made by Mark who has a blog called Foosball Zone. On his blog, he has many articles about foosball in light of the fact that he needs to show to individuals around him all how astounding foosball is. For some intriguing foosball articles including the foosball table and coffee table, visit his blog on this link: http://www.foosballzone.com/foosball-coffee-table/

Cool coffee tables for your home

Coffee tables should be seen as main furniture part of each living room since they are where the entire family sits together. You don’t want to have ancient coffee tables which will impress your grandparents and not your guests in your living room right? To save you from the boring and ancient coffee tables I am suggesting you new, cool designs of coffee tables which will brighten your room completely.

Paper Table

This is 100% green table and the designer, Matt Gagnon, wanted to make sure that it is good for the environment. Now, this is not the only furniture piece he has done because he has made an entire line of eco-accommodating furniture. What makes this table so special is the fact that it is made from the laser-cut reused sheet paper and it looks fascinating. The table is extremely straightforward yet stylish and you can see from the photo it has openings and cuts. Those are really stockpiling for magazines which is pretty impressive.

Paper Table

 

 

Foosball coffee table

This end table has two purposes, it is a coffee table yet it is likewise a foosball table. A table may not end in a living room, especially if your wife is the designer, but it is a perfect piece for a man cave.  Produced using hardwood, the table has playing surface, poles, and safety glass over the field. It is an extraordinary table for foosers and it additionally has a storage room in the base region.

Chicago Gaming Table

Alburni Coffee Tables

The tables make a special connection between nature and building. As should be obvious from the photo, the table best is really a cross-segment of a real wood and the legs are made of steel. With this table, you have a piece of nature in your room, a section that fits flawlessly in the present day, eco-accommodating encompassing.

Alburni Coffee Tables

Concrete Coffee Table

Concrete is getting increasingly famous in furniture industry which makes this table a standout amongst the most needed pieces of lounge rooms. The table doesn’t have legs and it would appear that 3 solid sheets, however, it isn’t produced using concrete. As should be obvious from the plan, the table has much room for things on its 3 levels. That implies you can sort out remote controls, magazines, books, and mugs on the table and you will still have space for things on it.

Concrete or Slate Coffee Table

 

 

Stone Coffee Table

It doesn’t make a difference whether we are discussing marble, rock or some other sort, stone tables look stunning without fail. Today I have picked a roundabout stone table made with incredible steel legs which transform the table into a mechanical piece. A round stone is straightforward yet silver metal legs are in charge of the “bling” factor. The table best is produced using common stone which gives it enhancement in your living room.

Stone Coffee Table

Our progress and our Christmas Wishes — Thank you!

In lieu of our monthly homesteading update in the “How To” Department, I really wanted to share with you where we are and what we are up to these days –

Our goal for almost two years now is to find our land and begin work on our homestead and cabin. As we shared earlier this year, we finally found that place in the Cumberland Plateau of Middle Tennessee surrounded by nature and mountains. Over this past summer we had our land cleared, along with water, septic, and electrical installed.

We finally decided to take the plunge, rent a neighboring cabin for a few short months and work on our cabin….My wife has been working at a steady pace boxing up the things we want to take and leaving behind things we really don’t have room for.  Afterall, we are downsizing from a little over 2000 square feet to less than 600 square feet when it’s done.

For our family, our upcoming move in the next couple of weeks will make it so much easier to have the ability to work on our cabin and move in as soon as we can.  It’s just not possible while still living in Florida.  Shortly after our arrival at the rental we will begin the process of having the cabin shell delivered and start to work…..We plan to keep you updated as our work-in-progress continues  over the next few months.

On this quiet Christmas eve- eve,  Cheri and I wanted to take this opportunity to thank you for following both our blogs and hope you will continue to do so in the coming year…Once she has some time in her busy schedule she will update you at her Blog here

In the meantime please feel free to visit my Homesteading Store and make a purchase. While we don’t make much of a profit, any proceeds keeps our Blogs running and helps us with our Homestead needs.

Until later, We Wish you and your family a Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous 2018.

Slow Moving but new things…

It seems like an eternity since my last post.  At times things seem to slow down and not move as fast as anyone would like.  With my line of business and in Florida, my work has rolled into our annual busy season. That’s the reason I haven’t been able to post as I should, or, would like to.  Work has just been keeping me busy!

In the near future, I plan to retire from my current business and began work with my wife on our future homestead.  We made the decision to move near our Property and rent a cabin from one of our future neighbors. As remote as the property is, we knew it would be a good idea to live close and pace ourselves to complete our cabin.  We are hoping for a smooth transition now that we have a septic tank, water, and electric service in place.

While we have also been planning our move.. we setup a Homesteading Store on the Blog. You can find some exciting Homestead items Here

Be sure to check out our Line of Mini-Split Systems or PEX plumbing supplies and Kits for Cabins and Tiny Houses.  Any and All profits will be used to maintain the Blogs and helps us to finish our cabin.

And, The Big Sky Saga continues…..Our Latest Homestead Adventure

Sometimes, crazy things get in the way and slow you down. Over the past couple of months we have experienced just that! Our goal has been to continue our dream of having our own little private place to call home in the mountains of Tennessee. We gave you the lowdown on our progress to get our land cleared and the septic tank installed. I had hoped (before now) to give you the latest on our water line and electric install, but, crazy things just get in the way.

While we were busy planning to move right along and hopefully have a home in place, that was not to be. We applied for the water meter installation at our local water utility and were met with little resistance on that end. The ELECTRIC was a completely different story. When we applied for electric service with the local Member owned electric co-op, we were informed that we needed to obtain easements from the adjoining property owners nearby. The end of line electric pole was on a neighbors right of way thus we needed to get his written permission for the electric company to install a separate pole on his property and to run the power line from his existing pole. While he initially agreed to give us an easement, we had to wait almost 90 days to FINALLY receive it.

Needless to say, and with some frustration on our part, we were forced to seek some legal intervention and a close look at the Electric Co-Op Bylaws. While an Attorney was busy trying to convince the neighbor to sign an easement, we found a section of the Bylaw which gives any new members automatic easement for themselves and any others wanting electric service. It took a phone call to the Electric Co-Op Attorney and even more to the Co-Op Management to finally get some much-needed progress. While they decided that we made our point, approval was finally taking place.

A ninety day delay really put us behind schedule in making some effort to move forward. In August we were finally able to make a return trip to our property and finish the utilities. It turned out to be an all-out effort to coordinate our contractors to finish up. We were able to get Tucker Farms LLC back to dig trenches for the underground Electric line from the pole to our pedestal and a water line from our water meter. We were also able to hire David Garrett, an electrician in Livingston Tennessee to install our electric service. I would happily provide you with some contact information but he doesn’t do email or websites.
I do have a phone number if interested! He and his crew do great work and are dependable and affordable.

Electric Pedestal Installed

Our Electric Company was able to come out that same morning and install the electric line through a 100 foot trench to our service pedestal in a trench of 30 inches deep and 18 inches wide. This is required in many areas per electric code and cannot be within the same trench as any other utility line such as water or sewer.

In a separate trench for our water line I decided to use underground 3/4 inch PEX tubing. PEX is so easy to work with and is great for colder climates. Unlike PVC piping, PEX will expand about five times its size if frozen without breaking. We buried it at 24 inches deep which is well below the freeze line for our area. During the water line install we placed a 3/4 inch Freeze-proof Yard Hydrant ( for outside watering needs) from our local Big Box Store. I also added a brass T and extended the PEX another 10 feet to allow for our cabin water supply and plumbing needs. Using SharkBite fittings is the way to go with plumbing these days. By the way, my wife and I got a great deal on that 300 Feet of PEX tubing.

PEX Water Line Install

After most of the day working at our property we were finally able to install our water line and turn on the water from our meter!

Running Water Finally!

We were happy that the electric and water line were both installed that day even if it took us a frustrating three months to get there. But, It doesn’t end there!

When we were just about ready to order our cabin and begin the work to be able to live in it, Hurricane Irma decided to pay us a visit in Florida. We had been following the forecasts for several days and it certainly looked like she would be a monster storm. We decided that our better option would be to evacuate out of the storm’s path and hope for the best. We had no idea what we would return to once it was over. Besides taking the essential clothing and bare necessities, we also packed up laptops, computers, and recently purchased products for our new homestead. We didn’t want to lose that too!

When it was over we came back to a partially downed fence and our tree across the neighbor’s roof. Fortunately, there was no significant damage and we were spared from much worse than we thought! It cost us from what we call our “Tennessee Fund” to remove the tree and evacuate two states north.

In the meantime, while trying to recoup and obligations of work, I was able to update our Homestead Store with some new and exciting products. We hope that you will take a look Homesteading Store and make a purchase from us. While we don’t make a lot of money on it all profits go towards our Blog Hosting and future Homestead in our Mountains of Tennessee! If you have any questions about our Products feel free to ask.

Until Next time!!

Our Latest Blog Delay and a New Homesteading Store

It seems that much has been happening that delayed our posting of our latest trip to our Property in Tennessee. Fortunately, we were able to get the utilities installed after some “glitches” were resolved. I’ll explain that one later! BUT, we do have a brand new “Homesteading Store” carrying Tanked and Tankless Water Heaters, Heating and Air Mini Split systems, and assorted PEX plumbing products and kits for your Tiny House, Cabin, or Homestead. Be sure to visit our Homesteading Store for your product needs.

See you soon with the latest in Tennessee

Installing Our Homestead Septic System

Again we made our annual trip to our property in Tennessee although this time it would be different for us.  It was time to clear the property and install the septic system. We needed to be there to decide what areas we wanted cleared of underbrush,many small saplings, and a couple of dead trees.

After arriving on a rainy Monday afternoon  in Livingston we had lunch at a local downtown diner. It was a great little spot with an adjoining antique shop. You can find more about that on  Cheri’s Blog.

Early Tuesday morning we met with our Contractor, Benton Tucker with Tucker Farms LLC and his associate Jason Huggins at another local diner for breakfast. These guys made us feel welcomed and happy to do business with them.  During breakfast and between a few laughs we explained what we were looking for and decided to head out to the property and create a plan for tomorrows work.  We needed to decide where to clear for the septic system according to the Inspectors permit we had received. The permits will usually give you some idea of where the Inspector conducted the percolation test on the property and where the tank and drain field would need to be.  It was also important in knowing where we would be able to place our future home, placing utilities, driveways, gardens and other outbuildings we may have later. We walked the property with Benton and Jason while they provided some expertise and valuable insights of things we could consider. At the end of our walk we knew we would have a much better idea and vision once their equipment was on-site and the clearing began.

On Wednesday morning, after a short delay due to a flat tire on one of their trailers they arrived and began work immediately. Jason began work with the Forestry Mulcher clearing some of the property. This would allow us to get in much easier beyond the underbrush and briars. It would also help in clearing for the septic system.

Excavator digging Hole for Septic Tank after property is cleared

We were fortunate enough that Benton had already contacted the State Inspector to come out and inspect the installation and hopefully give us a completion permit.  The Inspector arrived much earlier than planned and decided to hang out with us for awhile while the digging and measuring continued and wait for the septic tank to arrive.

We had purchased a 1000 gallon Low Boy concrete septic tank for the system with a gravel- less drain field system approved by the State Environmental Health Inspector. These tanks need to be buried on site at least 6 feet in depth and level. That is normally the depth of these tanks. It will provide that the tank is level and will drain properly. For accuracy, our Contractor used a transit to measure the depths while being dug by the excavator. The top of the tank being close to ground level also provides easy access to the tank when its time to pump it out to remove waste. The Inspector informed me that our tank would more than likely only need to be pumped out once every 10 years or so. Much of that depends on use.

Now the septic tank is ready to lower into the ground..

Around noon the truck with the septic system arrived on-site and the work began to lower it into place and make sure it was level.  Once the tank was in place it was now time for the excavator operated by Cody ( another Tucker Farms Equipment Operator) to dig another trench for the drain field piping and gravel-less pipe. The permit called for 110 feet of gravel-less pipe which would stretch across the front of the property. This will allow any liquids accumulated in the septic tank to flow through the pipe to the drain field and be absorbed into the ground.  The piping and the ground will filter the liquids and pretty well render it harmless. In the below photograph you can see the gravel- less pipe in the foreground. It is nothing more than flexible perforated piping wrapped in a mesh sleeve and then outer wrapped in black plastic. Gravel-less pipe replaces the need to haul in gravel to put in the trench for the absorption process in waste treatment.  It seems to be much quicker and less expensive than a several hundred dollar truck load of gravel.

Installing Tank

Once the tank was installed in the ground they began digging the trench for the drain field piping.  In our case the trench needed to be 110 feet long and a few feet deep.  This would eventually tie into the septic tank by a section of PVC pipe to the drain field. This allows the liquids to reach the drain field for absorption. Many times the drain fields are commonly called leech fields.

Drain field trenching begins
Up close view of the trench

Once the trench is completely dug the tree roots will be removed to make installing the piping easier and clear of debris. They removed those with a cordless sawzall. Some prefer to simply remove them with a pair of loppers.

Once the system is in the ground you will need a local Health Department Inspector to come out and inspect the installation to make sure it meets code and will work properly. After it is inspected and passes, the Contractors will then cover it up. The Inspector would then give us a Certificate of Completion for our records and it meets code. We will also need this Certificate for the Electrical Permit.

 

The installation is complete!

Now that our septic system is installed it is important to remember that in many locales it is required to have septic systems installed by a Licensed Contractor in your particular state. Many of these same locations require you to have an approved method of disposing of waste, especially human waste.   The reason is simply that disposing of waste improperly allows the ground water ( aquifers)to be contaminated with human waste. Many aquifers are our main source of drinking water who use wells for water sources. Home made septic systems don’t always purify our drinking water. Many locales also allow approved composting toilets for disposal as long as running water is available to you.

You can be sure that if you are ever found in violation with a home made system you can face heavy fines and penalties.  Please do the right thing and install an approved septic system. Our health depends on it!

  • Check your local codes or with your local Health Department to find out what is approved and not approved in your area.

 

By the way, our water meter was installed this past week much to our surprise!

Utility Company installing our water meter

Be sure to visit Cheri’s Blog to read her take on our complete trip to our Homestead and things we did on our down time.

 

 

 

How To – Do you test for lead in your Homestead?

3M Lead test kit found in most big box home improvement stores

On our recent visit to our property in Tennessee earlier this month, we decided to grab a bite to eat downtown while waiting for our check-in at our rented apartment. We will get to the apartment accommodations ( they were outstanding) in a later post.

We found this quaint little restaurant tucked away inside a shared antique store ( Antique Market) with many vintage items to choose from including this great deal pictured.  It’s called the Apple Dish Restaurant located at 114 N. Court Square in downtown Livingston, Tennessee.  They have a small Facebook presence but no website. We wish they did!  It’s definitely a DO NOT MISS for a reasonably priced and great lunch and antiques.

Why Test for Lead?

Lead can be in many items in your homestead from piping, insulation, drywall and many plastic items, believe it or not.  It can also contaminate many cooking items, especially cast iron and metal. We found this gem ( pictured above) that my wife purchased as an early birthday gift for me.  After checking with my cast iron cooking resource we discovered by the appearance and Gate mark on the piece  that it was a pre-1900 cast iron bean pot.

As old as it is, it’s usually a good idea to check for lead before using it. Since the early days many homesteaders and gun enthusiasts used these to melt lead for ammunition and other items. Ammunition was and is the most popular. If you are like many of us, you don’t want lead in your food.

As an added gift, My wife picked up this lead test kit from our local Lowes Home Improvement store.  I decided immediately to give it a try.

How to Test for Lead–

These kits cost around $10.00 and come with two small vials of the test chemicals in each packet.  The kits includes instructions for testing many items including plastic, painted items, metals and alloys, copper pipe and drywall. You will need to scrape and clean an area to be tested. Its okay to leave some dust as the test will detect lead in the dust also.

The instructions tell you to remove a test vial, crush each end marked A and B. This will release the test chemicals in each side of the tube and combine them for the testing. Shake the tube twice to mix the chemicals. The contents will turn yellow.  Squeeze the tube until the cotton swab on the end turns yellow.

Once this step is completed rub the swab on the area to be tested for about 30 seconds. If the end of the cotton swab turns RED OR PINK their is Lead present.  I chose to test the bottom inside of the pot as this would be the area most likely to have any lead residue. Fortunately, my test did not turn red or pink, which was great news!

The kit will also include a small cardboard panel with circles on it. Each of these circles contain lead. After completing the lead test on the items tested, place the swab in one of the circles and move it around inside the circle. If the circle doesn’t turn red or pink, this indicates that your test was performed correctly and no presence of lead.

It is a relatively easy test to perform and give you some peace of mind about ingesting any lead.

Be sure to follow along as i am still working on our Blog post from our recent Homestead visit and the work completed.

 

Our Adventure is about to begin…..

The Road leading to our Property

 

In a couple of weeks we will make our annual trek to our property in the Cumberland Plateau of Tennessee.  For many of you following my Blog, Cheri and I will finally begin the process of clearing our property for our future homestead, and installing the necessary utilities that we will most certainly need.

It’s been close to a two year process in getting this far and we aren’t about to stop now.  In my previous Blog Post about our plans Here , I provided my insights in what we needed to do next.  With many ups and downs, and obstacles to overcome we are finally ready to get started.

During our few days there I will share with you our step by step process of how its coming along and hopefully have some pictures or videos to share.  We will see how good the internet speed really is in those mountains –

Please feel free to follow Cheri’s Blog for updates on our adventure at cheriannjones

She would love to have you follow along with her latest updates on our project and plans.

How To Plant An Onion That Has Sprouted? Grab These 9 Easy Steps Now!

Our Guest Article  is from Lucy Clark, Chief Editor at Garden Ambition

Hi there! I’m Lucy – founder of GardenAmbition.com and  
I’m a self-confessed garden fanatic. Gardening has always been a passion of mine and 
will always be my favorite pastime. Now that I am married and have one adorable son, I 
have the time to write and share my personal experiences with other garden enthusiasts 
like me.

Did you know how to plant an onion that has sprouted? If not, then now is the best time to add spice and yummy flavors to raw or cooked dishes through growing your very own onions. But how can you grow one?

 

 

Compared to other vegetables and plants, onion can grow again through planting either the part with a rooted mass on the bottom or an entire onion bulb. As soon as you planted and watered it, the roots located at the bottom will start to develop. After that, green onions will start to grow right at the top of the old onion.

HOW CAN YOU GROW A SPROUTED ONION?

Consider these step-by-step procedures if you want know how to plant an onion that has sprouted:

A Small onion held by hand with fertilizer

 

  1. Choose a healthy-looking onion which has sprouts in 8 inches or 12 inches pots. Pick one in every pot. Don’t forget to cut off rotted, pitted, or moldy parts prior to planting. Take care and maintain the core and the roots of the bulb.
  2. Start filling every pot with a good potting mix. As much as possible, leave some inches space on the top.
  3. Create a hole in the middle of the soil which about the depth and width of the vegetable.
  4. After that, put every onion in one pot carefully while layering it with enough soil to allow the base of the shoots meets the surface of the soil.
  5. Gently but firmly press down the soil to get rid of the air pockets.
  6.  Then thoroughly water the pot until the water goes out from the drainage holes.
  7. Next thing to do when you want to learn how to plant an onion that has sprouted is that you have to place the pots under a shaded spot for a few weeks. Let them get sufficient amount of sunlight but never expose them directly to the light. You should know that their roots need time to adjust and cultivate. Moreover, don’t forget to add fertilizer. You can also used shredded leaves and twigs as a natural fertilizer for your onions.

 

A closer look of onion while inside the plantation

  1. Slowly expose them to more sunlight after a couple of weeks. You may start at partial shade, then after some time, allow them to have a full sun exposure.
  2. If necessary, harvest the sprouts. You could utilize onion sprouts on anything you would utilize onion. It will surely make a delightful garnish.

 

IS IT SAFE TO EAT SPROUTED ONIONS?

The answer to that question would be a resounding Yes. It’s still good especially if the shoots and roots are still tiny. In fact, some individuals out there love to eat sprouted onions. This vegetable is well-known with vegans as they contain plenty of proteins.

 

Closer look of onions in the field

Just be sure to check for rot or mold particularly if this thing has been stuck around in a cool and dark area for more than one week. When you notice that there are molds, simply cut that part out and eat the rest. However, if the onion is already black in color or too mushy, throw it away.

 

WHEN IS THE BEST TIME TO PLANT ONIONS?

Another thing to take note if you are determined to learn how to plant an onion that has sprouted is the right time to grow it. Many people plant their own onion as soon as spring comes. However, did you know that it is possible to have a head start right on your harvest through planting during fall too?

 

A fresh sprout in an onion

Why opt to plant during fall? Primarily, this is the time when there just a few tasks that you need to do. In addition to that, onions that are planted at this moment are more reliable and more productive than their counterparts. Most of the time, they are less prone to pests, which enjoy munching on these vegetables. To get rid of these pests, spray chemicals.

TIME TO HARVEST!

After knowing how to plant an onion that has sprouted, it’s about time to learn how to harvest it. Once you’ve noticed that the growing onion raised a bit out of the soil, and the leaves begin to turn yellow, this already indicates that it is time for harvest.

 

A bulb onion which has a short sprout

Generally, through bending its leaves, you are stopping them from growing further. Cut off the flowing sap so that you can divert all energy of the plant into the growing bulb. Approximately 50% of the top should be broken over prior to harvesting onions.

You can leave the onion in an open sunlight for a couple of days to dry the tops and necks. Take note that it is not advisable for extremely hot areas. Better use shady, airy places to avoid direct sunlight which might damage the bulb.

Fresh onions which can be found in the market

FINAL THOUGHTS

There you go – the things you need to know on how to plant an onion that has sprouted. Just like other veggies out there, you need to exert effort, time, and accuracy to achieve better results. Planting onions, as an essential kitchen staple, is a great help. Aside from the fact that it reduces the need to buy from supermarkets, it also assures you that you will receive fresh vegetables.

Thank you for reading this article, and don’t forget to share! Hope it helps you a lot.

Preparing our Homestead for the next move…

Over the past few weeks my wife and I have discussed our next moves to get our future homestead going and making it livable.  We really needed to decide how we want the property laid out..where the cabin will be placed..and the other necessities that we will need. Since the property is now raw land  it is going to be a learning experience to start fresh.

We began by finding a contractor and asking for a quote to clear the land for us. We had originally thought about doing it ourselves by hand but knew that would be time consuming if not demanding on our body.  Hiring a contractor would also make the process go much faster.

When we began talking to the Contractor we also found that he is a licensed Septic System installer and could help us with that also. It turned into a win -win for us along with the great price he gave us.  He suggested that we begin by installing the septic system first.

During the permitting process the Inspector draws a diagram on the permit indicating where the tank and drain field should go on the property. That’s where he did the “percolation test”. This will give us an idea of where we would need to put the cabin on the property and any electrical poles and water lines. I don’t think anyone wants a power pole or water line in the middle of a septic field.

It also makes sense to place our cabin on the property where we can take advantage of energy efficiency, sunlight for solar– if we choose that later– and those great breezes through the windows.

Our Septic Contractor also recommended a local electrician to help us with the electric grid hookup.  We found that the best way to obtain electric on our property would be having an electrician install an RV service pole on the property. Depending on the type of dwelling you want for your residence it really made more sense with an RV service hookup. We could easily place a cabin on the property and simply Plug it in, with an extra weatherproof outdoor receptacle for our camper. We are considering adding 200 amp service for any later expansion. The local Electrical Inspector advised us that would be acceptable and pass inspection. Usually, the electric companies will not provide power to your property until they see some type of construction in progress.

We have also been fortunate that we found great neighbors who agreed to give us easements to run the power line drops across their properties to reach ours.

Even though we would like things to move a little faster we plan to head that way in early June to meet the contractor when he clears the property and installs the septic system. We want to take some time before his arrival and decide where and what we want cleared away from the septic system. Our visit will also give us a chance to apply for electric and water service. Feel free to follow along in the month of June as I will be providing updates and photos or videos from our project and its progress.

If you happen to need clearing or septic installation in the Livingston Tennessee area we will happily provide a free plug for the company we are using.  Feel free to contact Benton Tucker at Tucker Farms LLC 

Take the time to read my wife Cheri’s take on our upcoming plans at her Blog Here